Native Flower A4 Prints (6 Designs)

Heysmartypants

  • $35.00
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These beautiful prints make perfect gifts. Reproduced digitally on Mohawk Felt 260GSM acid-free textured paper for archival permanence. Every print is signed by hand.

Designs: 

Tikumu: Maori would peel off the silvery underside from the leaves off and these were attached in rows with a whitau (fibre) to create a rain cape. The soft white down was also worked into the whitau to make a garment waterproof. The leaves were used as shin protectors for warmth and to guard against thorny plants. The down was also used as a wound dressing.

Horokaka: Produces an insipid fruit which can be eaten, also the leaves which 'make a very good pickle’ (Taylor 1847). Maori treated boils with juices from the leaves. Early Europeans pickled the leaves and the ripe fruit was eaten raw. 

Kōwhai: One of the best known and iconic native trees in New Zealand. Kōwhai are an important seasonal nectar food source for Tui and Bellbirds, and Kereru feast on thier leaves and flowers. The name kōwhai comes from the Māori word for yellow—a reference to the colour of the flower. 

Kowhai Ngutukaka’s: The beautiful flowers and edible seedpods make this plant attractive to gardeners and were used by Māori for gifting and trading. Its seed remains viable for a long time and therefore can be stored and transported easily. 

Harakeke: Many of the special forms that were cultivated by Māori for weaving were almost lost during the twentieth century. Luckily, a few collections of special flaxes were maintained over the years, and have sparked a revival in flax weaving over the last 20 years. Harekeke is also used in soaps, hand creams, shampoos, flaxseed oil and a range of other cosmetics. 

Piripiri: Also known by the common name bidibid, bidi-bidi, biddy-biddy, biddi-biddi, biddi-bid! The fruit is a dense ball of many seeds. In some species, the seeds have a barbed arrowhead point, forming a burr which attaches itself to animal fur or feathers for dispersal. 


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